Dating a guy with divorced parents

Rated 4.66/5 based on 924 customer reviews

Co-parenting after a split is rarely easy, especially if you have a contentious relationship with your ex-partner.You may be concerned about your ex’s parenting abilities, stressed about child support or other financial issues, feel worn down by conflict, or think you’ll never be able to overcome all the resentments in your relationship.Remember that it isn’t always necessary to meet your ex in person—speaking over the phone or exchanging texts or emails is fine for the majority of conversations. Even if you end up disagreeing with the other parent, you should at least be able to convey to your ex that you’ve understood their point of view.

Approach the relationship with your ex as a business partnership where your “business” is your children’s well-being. Instead of making statements, which can be misinterpreted as demands, try framing as much as you can as requests. But by practicing quick stress relief techniques, you can learn to stay in control when the pressure builds.

The key to successful co-parenting is to separate the personal relationship with your ex from the co-parenting relationship.

It may be helpful to start thinking of your relationship with your ex as a completely new one—one that is entirely about the well-being of your children, and not about either of you.

With these tips, you can remain calm, stay consistent, and resolve conflicts to make joint custody work and enable your kids to thrive.

Unless your family has faced serious issues such as domestic violence or substance abuse, co-parenting—having both parents play an active role in their children’s daily lives—is the best way to ensure all your kids’ needs are met and they are able to retain close relationships with both parents.

Leave a Reply